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Project tutorial: Cristaria Shrug with Cascade Ultra Pima

Named for a pearl mussel that produces freshwater pearls, the Cristaria shrug is a quick, pretty knit shrug that complements formal summer ensembles or casual looks alike. Add beads or pearls for a piece that is truly your own!back of christaria shrug Materials: Stitch abbreviations:
  • yo— yarn over
  • k2tog— knit 2 stitches together
Directions &  Hints: Cast on 108 stitches, leaving at least a 12˝ tail. This will seem longer than it needs to be, but don’t fret! Take a look at the picture to the right. Imagine taking your straight cast-on edge & bending it into the wavy bottom edge of the shrug. That’s why your finished piece won’t be anywhere near as wide as it seems now.
  • Row 1: knit across
  • Row 2: purl across
Here comes the exciting part: the lace row. This sequence of increases & decreases is what turns a fairly ordinary stitch pattern into something visually interesting (and, in this case, wavy!). During each repeat, you are going to decrease a total of 6 times (the k2tog stitches) and increase a total of 6 times (the yarn overs). So, even though you’re subtracting stitches in some places & adding them in others, your total stitch count at the end of each row should always be the same (108, to be precise).
  • Row 3: k2tog 3 times, *k1, yo* 6 times, k2tog 3 times. Place stitch marker. Repeat across row 5 more times.
Phew! Take a step back & congratulate yourself— you just finished the tricky part & I bet it looks like a rat’s nest, doesn’t it? Just remember: you’re taking a wavy row & straightening it out onto your needle, so it really should look a bit confused.
  • Row 4: knit across
And that’s really all there is to it! You’ll repeat those 4 rows about 14 more times, depending on how big around you’d like your armholes. To finish, bind off & break yarn, leaving at least a 12˝ tail.

ontheneedles Don't panic when your work-in-progress looks bunchy!

Diving in Deeper: The lace row sure does have a lot of counting— wouldn’t it be a lot easier to use more markers? A tempting proposition, no? Normally, I prefer to use markers like big red flags to remind me when it’s time to change stitches. In this pattern, though, the markers are smack dab in the middle of a bunch of k2togs! There is method to my madness (well, this time, at least…). This is an atypical lace pattern in that the increases are all bundled together & the decreases are all bundled together. A more regular (rectangular) pattern usually peppers them across the row in pairs. Because of this, if you plunk down markers willy-nilly, they will actually migrate across the row & mess you up! So, the short answer is that markers are only useful to a point on this pattern. Think of them more as error correction tools— if you end up with anything other than 18 stitches between markers, you know something has gone wrong in that section. The “short answer?” That didn’t seem very short at all. Out of morbid curiosity, what was the long answer? Plate tectonics! Excuse me? No, really! The stitch markers show you the center of a double-sided stitch “subduction” zone— basically a stitch gobbler. It’s like the stitch markers are hovering over very aggressive black holes that pull stitches in & make them disappear. Conversely, in the middle of each increase section (right after the 3rd yarn over, to be precise) is a “mid-ocean ridge” of stitches— a place where new stitches bubble up to the surface & spread out. If you placed a stitch marker at each of these spots,  you could imagine them hovering over tiny stitch factories, creating new stitches & pumping them outward. The whole row would look something like this: pacman1 Which, to me, looks a whole lot like this: red-yellow Wow, this is really getting out of hand. Anything else you’ve been dying to get off your chest? Well, since you asked… The idea for how & where to use stitch markers (as a way to catch & isolate mistakes instead of to tell you when to change stitches) came from the mathematical basis for error-correcting code. Also, the function y(x) = 2.5 cos (2π x/13), with x & y in centimeters, describes each row of this pattern. Whee! Finishing: String a single freshwater pearl onto each of about 25 head pins. Trim pin ends & bend into loops. Attach pins at the bottom of the soft U-shaped rows of the center 3 columns of stitches (see picture), or use whatever arrangement strikes your fancy. closeup Use reserved yarn tails to attach corners of finished piece to create armholes. Weave in ends & trim. Now throw it over a sundress & go put Audrey Hepburn to shame. meghan123 Ready to turn your screen off & start knitting? Download Cristaria Shrug tutorial  for a printable version of this post, or Download Cristaria Shrug pattern for a no-nonsense, 1-page printable pattern.

XOXOXOXO, Meg :)

This shrug was knitted with Cascade Yarns Ultra Pima in Heathered Pansy #3705. © 2011 Meghan Bosanko
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Posted by Jonas Lykins on

Jonas Lykins

Very neat blog post.Much thanks again. Really Cool.

Posted by Doreen peluso on

Need help

Posted by Doreen peluso on

What size is finished shrug sm med, large

Posted by Doreen peluso on

What size is the finished shrug?

Posted by Melissa Burnett on

Doreen,
The finished size is the same for S, M and L. It is customizable by sewing more or less of the edge after knitting. Create a larger opening for a size L by sewing just the edges together and a smaller opening by sewing a few inches and creating a size S. If your size is outside of S, M and L you might want to add a pattern repeat to create plus sizes or take a repeat out to create even smaller sizing.

If you need a size that is only SLIGHTLY smaller or larger, consider going down or up a needle size!

Posted by Regina H. on

Thanks. A lovely way to use the Shetland ‘Old Shale’ (aka Old Shell) lace pattern. Actually, using markers in the appropriate place in the pattern can help. Old Shale is an 18 stitch, 4 row repeat. Understanding the rhythm of the stitches and using the markers after each 18 stitch repeat can help the knitter just beginning to dabble in simple lace to be successful. Learning to ‘read’ your stitches in knitting is a definite bonus and leads not only to completed projects but adventure in tackling new ones. There is a popular shawl pattern on Ravelry which uses Old Shale. Almost all of the problems addressed on the help board for the pattern are solved by stitch markers. To learn more about Old Shale read the Northern Lace blog at: http://northernlace.wordpress.com/2010/03/12/feather-and-fan-versus-old-shale/

Now, to buy beads and make this for a Christmas present!

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